Five new exhibits at AMAM


Staff Report



Courtesy image “The Actor Ichikawa Kodanji IV as Torii Matasuke,” 1860, by Tsukioka Yoshitoshi, 1839-1892. The color woodblock print is the gift of Paul Walter, a 1957 graduate of Oberlin College.


Now open at the Allen Memorial Art Museum are the following exhibits:

“Lines of Descent: Masters and Students in the Utagawa School” is in the Ripin Gallery through May 21.

This exhibition traces the history of an important group of woodblock printmakers in Japan, the Utagawa School. Founded in the Edo Period (1603-1868) by Utagawa Toyoharu, this lineage went on to produce some of the most celebrated print designers in Japanese art.

The 52 prints on view include dynamic actor prints by Toyokuni and Kunisada, the renowned landscape prints of Hiroshige, the dramatic narratives of Kuniyoshi, and the creative and technical brilliance of Yoshitoshi. Utagawa works from the late 18th to the early 20th centuries demonstrate the links between master print designers and their students, who often became masters themselves, as well as how the school adapted to rapid modernization during Japan’s Meiji Period (1868-1912).

“Exploring Reciprocity: The Power of Animals in Non-Western Art” is in the Ripin Gallery through May 21.

Animals act as companions and contributors to human life in this exhibition featuring works ranging from Japanese woodblock prints to whalebone sculptures of indigenous North America.

Many non-Western communities today draw on these relationships as a resource in the face of colonialism, exploitation, and environmental devastation.

“The Archaic Character of Seal Script” is in the Ripin Gallery through May 21.

The historical and artistic dimensions of seal script, the oldest form of Chinese writing, are explored in works spanning centuries.

“Form and Light: Brett Weston Photographs” is in the Ripin Gallery through May 21.

Born in Los Angeles in 1911, Brett Weston became known as a photographer of landscapes and still life. In 1925, he and his father, renowned American photographer Edward Weston, traveled to Mexico, where he met painters Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera, along with photographer Tina Modotti.

Many of the works were donated by the Christian Keesee Collection and the Brett Weston Archive.

“Images in Black and White” is in the Education Hallway through July 2.

How does photography as a medium, art form, and documentary method construct identity and stereotype? Six photographs explore how imagery in contemporary American media establishes visual expectations associated with such concepts as the “beautiful,” the “moral,” and even the “criminal.”

The AMAM is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday; 1-5 p.m. Sunday; and closed Mondays and major holidays.

Free educational or group guided tours may be arranged by calling 440-775-8665.

Courtesy image “The Actor Ichikawa Kodanji IV as Torii Matasuke,” 1860, by Tsukioka Yoshitoshi, 1839-1892. The color woodblock print is the gift of Paul Walter, a 1957 graduate of Oberlin College.

http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/44/2017/01/web1_1988.29.15.jpg

Courtesy image “The Actor Ichikawa Kodanji IV as Torii Matasuke,” 1860, by Tsukioka Yoshitoshi, 1839-1892. The color woodblock print is the gift of Paul Walter, a 1957 graduate of Oberlin College.

Staff Report