9/11 remembered by JVS students, essay winner want to keep information fresh in minds


By Jonathan Delozier - jdelozier@aimmediamidwest.com



Lorain County JVS students Madison Murphy, Kent Hurlbert, Lia Douglas, and principal Jill Petitti remember 9/11 during a ceremony Monday morning. Douglas was the winner of this year’s 9/11 essay contest held by the school.


Photos by Jonathan Delozier | AIM Media Midwest and courtesy photo

JVS students and staff share a moment of silence as color guard members lower the school’s flag to half-mast.


Photos by Jonathan Delozier | AIM Media Midwest and courtesy photo

Color guard members Mark Simons, Eric Phillips, and Colin Shaffstall.


Photos by Jonathan Delozier | AIM Media Midwest and courtesy photo

This wreath was constructed and laid by students Madison Murphy and Kent Hurlbert.


Photos by Jonathan Delozier | AIM Media Midwest and courtesy photo

IN HER WORDS

“So what can we do? We can remember. We can remember the event that created a new era in our history. We should remember and reflect on all past events in our history, because in our brief time as a nation we’ve made mistakes. Our nation is not perfect, but the duty falls on us as the next generation to learn to rise above our differences and learn from our history so that we can become a more united country.”

Excerpt from Lia Douglas’ essay

Lia Douglas was only two months old during the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

That hasn’t stopped her, however, from researching the tragic day for most of her life. Using that knowledge, the Lorain County JVS junior won this year’s 9/11 essay contest and read her work in front of fellow students Monday.

Since erecting a 9/11 memorial complete with a seven-foot portion of a beam from the World Trade Center in 2012, the JVS has held an essay contest followed by a memorial ceremony every year at 8:46 a.m. — the same time American Airlines Flight 11 crashed into the WTC’s north tower.

Douglas and her family lived about 45 minutes outside of Washington, D.C., during the attacks.

“The vast majority of the people here today don’t even remember 9/11, myself included,” she said. “We have family members and friends who experienced this. They knew what it was like to go through this. It hits very close to home. Even if we don’t remember it happening, we need to realize we’re the next generation. If we want the world to change, it has to fall to us.”

JVS seniors Madison Murphy and Kent Hurlbert constructed a wreath and laid it next to the memorial.

“This opportunity I’ve been given today is huge for me,” said Hurlbert. “I’ve never gotten to do anything like this and absolutely wanted to be a part of it. I wasn’t around when this happened either, but I’ve been very well-educated on it and what came about because of it. It’s impacted everyone. I just want to thank everyone who helped out during the attack and those who made the ultimate sacrifice.”

The memorial was designed by JVS students in programs such as computer design, public safety, masonry trades, and collision repair with the help of local volunteers. Marketing and management students took the lead in fundraising efforts for construction in early 2012. It was dedicated Sept. 22, 2014.

“It’s very important for students to take a half-hour out of their day to remember what happened on 9/11,” said JVS high school principal Jill Petitti. “It’s become such a ritual that I have students in August asking me, ‘When do I start my essay?’ They know the ceremony is coming and want to be a part of it. I never have to hunt anyone down.”

Douglas said building an informational bridge between people who are old enough to remember 9/11 and those who aren’t is very important to her.

“If we want a world where we’re all equal one day we all have to work toward it together,” she said. “Yes, we’re very blessed to have the rights we do, but for every right we have, a responsibility comes with it. It’s not free. People paid a price for it. This is an honor for me to get to say that to my peers.”

Jonathan Delozier can be reached at 440-647-3171 or @DelozierNews on Twitter.

Lorain County JVS students Madison Murphy, Kent Hurlbert, Lia Douglas, and principal Jill Petitti remember 9/11 during a ceremony Monday morning. Douglas was the winner of this year’s 9/11 essay contest held by the school.
http://www.theoberlinnewstribune.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/44/2017/09/web1_IMG_20170911_085521-3.jpgLorain County JVS students Madison Murphy, Kent Hurlbert, Lia Douglas, and principal Jill Petitti remember 9/11 during a ceremony Monday morning. Douglas was the winner of this year’s 9/11 essay contest held by the school.

Photos by Jonathan Delozier | AIM Media Midwest and courtesy photo

JVS students and staff share a moment of silence as color guard members lower the school’s flag to half-mast.
http://www.theoberlinnewstribune.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/44/2017/09/web1_Presentation-of-Colors-3.jpgJVS students and staff share a moment of silence as color guard members lower the school’s flag to half-mast.

Photos by Jonathan Delozier | AIM Media Midwest and courtesy photo

Color guard members Mark Simons, Eric Phillips, and Colin Shaffstall.
http://www.theoberlinnewstribune.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/44/2017/09/web1_IMG_20170911_090042-3.jpgColor guard members Mark Simons, Eric Phillips, and Colin Shaffstall.

Photos by Jonathan Delozier | AIM Media Midwest and courtesy photo

This wreath was constructed and laid by students Madison Murphy and Kent Hurlbert.
http://www.theoberlinnewstribune.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/44/2017/09/web1_IMG_20170911_091010-3.jpgThis wreath was constructed and laid by students Madison Murphy and Kent Hurlbert.

Photos by Jonathan Delozier | AIM Media Midwest and courtesy photo

By Jonathan Delozier

jdelozier@aimmediamidwest.com

IN HER WORDS

“So what can we do? We can remember. We can remember the event that created a new era in our history. We should remember and reflect on all past events in our history, because in our brief time as a nation we’ve made mistakes. Our nation is not perfect, but the duty falls on us as the next generation to learn to rise above our differences and learn from our history so that we can become a more united country.”

Excerpt from Lia Douglas’ essay