New computers, IB expansion at OHS


We asked principal William Baylis: What are you looking forward to most this year? “I love kids. I want to be back with this kids in the building. It’s hard to be a captain on a boat with no sailors.” What do you see as your greatest challenge? “I still think it’s going to be the testing. There’s still the question of the unknown.” It’s also tough for OHS because it is such a small school and educators are only looking at about 70 students’ test scores for each class. “It’s kind of hard to compare one test score until you can see a student’s scores over multiple years.” What message do you have for new students coming into your building? “I’m always excited when kids come to the building because it’s their last four years of educational experience here in Oberlin. We hope they perform their best efforts and energies and take advantage of their high school experience. Get involved in extracurricular activities, take your studies seriously, and make sure you’re using your resources you have available in a small district you wouldn’t have in a big district such as two principals and two guidance counselors.” What do you want parents to know? “I’m proud of the fact that we have been recognized nationally as a school that works well for kids, for our highest achievers as well as our low-income students. We make miracles happen. We graduated a kid last year that came to us as a junior with five credits and we graduated him in two years. That kid that had significant failure in ninth grade and sophomore year at a district and comes to us and catches up to graduate says a lot about our staff and our commitment to all students, not just high-achievers.”


We asked principal William Baylis: What are you looking forward to most this year? “I love kids. I want to be back with this kids in the building. It’s hard to be a captain on a boat with no sailors.” What do you see as your greatest challenge? “I still think it’s going to be the testing. There’s still the question of the unknown.” It’s also tough for OHS because it is such a small school and educators are only looking at about 70 students’ test scores for each class. “It’s kind of hard to compare one test score until you can see a student’s scores over multiple years.” What message do you have for new students coming into your building? “I’m always excited when kids come to the building because it’s their last four years of educational experience here in Oberlin. We hope they perform their best efforts and energies and take advantage of their high school experience. Get involved in extracurricular activities, take your studies seriously, and make sure you’re using your resources you have available in a small district you wouldn’t have in a big district such as two principals and two guidance counselors.” What do you want parents to know? “I’m proud of the fact that we have been recognized nationally as a school that works well for kids, for our highest achievers as well as our low-income students. We make miracles happen. We graduated a kid last year that came to us as a junior with five credits and we graduated him in two years. That kid that had significant failure in ninth grade and sophomore year at a district and comes to us and catches up to graduate says a lot about our staff and our commitment to all students, not just high-achievers.”
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/44/2015/08/web1_IMG_5620.jpgWe asked principal William Baylis: What are you looking forward to most this year? “I love kids. I want to be back with this kids in the building. It’s hard to be a captain on a boat with no sailors.” What do you see as your greatest challenge? “I still think it’s going to be the testing. There’s still the question of the unknown.” It’s also tough for OHS because it is such a small school and educators are only looking at about 70 students’ test scores for each class. “It’s kind of hard to compare one test score until you can see a student’s scores over multiple years.” What message do you have for new students coming into your building? “I’m always excited when kids come to the building because it’s their last four years of educational experience here in Oberlin. We hope they perform their best efforts and energies and take advantage of their high school experience. Get involved in extracurricular activities, take your studies seriously, and make sure you’re using your resources you have available in a small district you wouldn’t have in a big district such as two principals and two guidance counselors.” What do you want parents to know? “I’m proud of the fact that we have been recognized nationally as a school that works well for kids, for our highest achievers as well as our low-income students. We make miracles happen. We graduated a kid last year that came to us as a junior with five credits and we graduated him in two years. That kid that had significant failure in ninth grade and sophomore year at a district and comes to us and catches up to graduate says a lot about our staff and our commitment to all students, not just high-achievers.”

Students will experience minor changes this year at Oberlin High School.

The building received new computers in the media center to match the district’s upgrade to using Google services.

Principal William Baylis said there are no changes to the school’s curriculum this year but the goal will be to expand the International Baccalaureate courses launched in 2014-2015 to every student in 11th grade. This year, every English class at the high school will be an IB course.

“I’m excited about IB for all students,” Baylis said. “Every kid is going to have some IB experience. I think all of our kids are getting better instruction.”

He said the courses the school has offered through IB continue to improve and foster stronger students.

Baylis is disappointed to see two Lorain County JVS programs leave his building this year. The JVS has pulled the Career-Based Intervention class and Project Lead the Way.

CBI was a class that helped students interested in attending the JVS find which career path to pursue and Project Lead the Way was a beginning engineering class.

“Now if a kid wants to be involved in that program they’ll have to go to the JVS,” Baylis said.

Baylis is very excited that students will only have one window of state testing this spring after the demise of Ohio’s PARCC exam.

“We’re obviously excited that it stops our building from being disrupted in two blocks of time,” Baylis said. “I think we lost our way last year.”

He said nearly every staff meeting he held last year focused on testing and not on improving teaching methods or instruction.

Baylis plans to get back on track and make sure his meetings emphasize helping teachers enhance each student’s education.

Valerie Urbanik can be reached at 440-775-1611 or on Twitter @ValUrbanik.

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