Japanese-American exhibit opens to the public


The interactive exhibit asks visitors to share a time when they or someone they know has been courageous. One wrote, “My mom struggles every day with addiction issues but she never gives up. Each day, she wakes up and tries again to be a better mother for me and my siblings.”

The interactive exhibit asks visitors to share a time when they or someone they know has been courageous. One wrote, “My mom struggles every day with addiction issues but she never gives up. Each day, she wakes up and tries again to be a better mother for me and my siblings.”


Glen and Kathie Loafmann peer into a glass exhibit of letters written by Japanese-Americans during their time in camps.


Japanese-Americans were given one week to pack up all their belongings before being transported miles from their homes.


Photos by Laurie Hamame | Oberlin News-Tribune

Oberlin College was one of the first colleges to accept Japanese-Americans after being released from internment camps after World War II. This community story of courage is brought to life in “Courage and Compassion: Our Shared Story of the Japanese American WWII Experience,” a traveling exhibition that is being hosted by the college through March 18. The interactive show opened its doors to the public this past weekend and covers events of World War II from the attack on Pearl Harbor to the incarceration of Japanese-Americans to the postwar fight for redress. It also asks visitors to think about what it means to be courageous and to reflect on difficult decisions.

“Courage and Compassion” is free and open to public at the Richard D. Baron ’64 Art Gallery, 65 East College St. It will be open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturdays and noon to 5 p.m. Sundays.

The interactive exhibit asks visitors to share a time when they or someone they know has been courageous. One wrote, “My mom struggles every day with addiction issues but she never gives up. Each day, she wakes up and tries again to be a better mother for me and my siblings.”
https://www.theoberlinnewstribune.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/44/2018/02/web1_IMG_7825.jpgThe interactive exhibit asks visitors to share a time when they or someone they know has been courageous. One wrote, “My mom struggles every day with addiction issues but she never gives up. Each day, she wakes up and tries again to be a better mother for me and my siblings.”

Glen and Kathie Loafmann peer into a glass exhibit of letters written by Japanese-Americans during their time in camps.
https://www.theoberlinnewstribune.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/44/2018/02/web1_IMG_7832.jpgGlen and Kathie Loafmann peer into a glass exhibit of letters written by Japanese-Americans during their time in camps.

Japanese-Americans were given one week to pack up all their belongings before being transported miles from their homes.
https://www.theoberlinnewstribune.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/44/2018/02/web1_IMG_7835.jpgJapanese-Americans were given one week to pack up all their belongings before being transported miles from their homes.