‘Frack off!’ demonstrators say at Oberlin pipeline site


Protesters rally against fracked gas line construction

By Laurie Hamame - lhamame@aimmediamidwest.com



Oberlin College student Rachael Hood leads a group of protesters in a chant at the site of the NEXUS pipeline on Oberlin’s south side.

Oberlin College student Rachael Hood leads a group of protesters in a chant at the site of the NEXUS pipeline on Oberlin’s south side.


Laurie Hamame | Oberlin News-Tribune

Protestors symbolically block the pipeline’s progress. No actual work was halted — workers were not on site Sunday.


Laurie Hamame | Oberlin News-Tribune

A sign is placed near the pipeline’s construction.


Laurie Hamame | Oberlin News-Tribune

The 255-mile pipeline passes through the south side of town between Hamilton Street and Reserve Avenue.


Laurie Hamame | Oberlin News-Tribune

The group walked along Reserve Avenue carrying pipelines and signs that read “Enbridge, frack off” and “Pipelines fail.”


Laurie Hamame | Oberlin News-Tribune

Protesters ended on Rt. 58, where they rallied in front of the pipeline’s construction zone.


Laurie Hamame | Oberlin News-Tribune

Eight anti-fracking advocates marched down Reserve Avenue on Sunday, bearing signs and defaced pipeline sections.

The protesters were small in number but their voices were loud as they rallied against the 255-mile NEXUS gas transmission pipeline installed nearly 100 feet from where they walked.

“Once you frack, you can’t go back!” they shouted in unison, turning onto Rt. 58 and standing in front of a NEXUS construction site. Drivers beeped horns in support as they zipped by.

The pipeline has been given the all-clear after months of litigation by homeowners and communities in its path.

Construction in Ohio began in March after Canadian company Enbridge asked a federal judge for permission to seize land through eminent domain. Prep work started on Oberlin’s southern border in May.

The rally began at the Oberlin Recreation Center pavilion, where members of Friends for Environmental Justice and No NEXUS Oberlin stressed the potential role gas projects play in environmental pollution and global warming.

Speakers emphasized how close the pipeline is being built to an established residential neighborhood and the health effects that may present.

The pipeline will come within an estimated 50 yards of homes along the north side of Reserve Avenue.

“Most importantly,” said Rachael Hood, an environmental studies major at Oberlin College, “we are still here and we haven’t given up the fight.”

A June 25 demonstration was also held at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission headquarters in Washington, D.C.

Protesters there demanded reforms, including those called for in the city of Oberlin appeal still working its way through federal court.

Laurie Hamame can be reached at 440-775-1611 or @HamameNews on Twitter.

Oberlin College student Rachael Hood leads a group of protesters in a chant at the site of the NEXUS pipeline on Oberlin’s south side.
https://www.theoberlinnewstribune.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/44/2018/06/web1_IMG_9086.jpgOberlin College student Rachael Hood leads a group of protesters in a chant at the site of the NEXUS pipeline on Oberlin’s south side.

Laurie Hamame | Oberlin News-Tribune

Protestors symbolically block the pipeline’s progress. No actual work was halted — workers were not on site Sunday.
https://www.theoberlinnewstribune.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/44/2018/06/web1_IMG_9050.jpgProtestors symbolically block the pipeline’s progress. No actual work was halted — workers were not on site Sunday.

Laurie Hamame | Oberlin News-Tribune

A sign is placed near the pipeline’s construction.
https://www.theoberlinnewstribune.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/44/2018/06/web1_IMG_9056.jpgA sign is placed near the pipeline’s construction.

Laurie Hamame | Oberlin News-Tribune

The 255-mile pipeline passes through the south side of town between Hamilton Street and Reserve Avenue.
https://www.theoberlinnewstribune.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/44/2018/06/web1_IMG_9044.jpgThe 255-mile pipeline passes through the south side of town between Hamilton Street and Reserve Avenue.

Laurie Hamame | Oberlin News-Tribune

The group walked along Reserve Avenue carrying pipelines and signs that read “Enbridge, frack off” and “Pipelines fail.”
https://www.theoberlinnewstribune.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/44/2018/06/web1_IMG_9107.jpgThe group walked along Reserve Avenue carrying pipelines and signs that read “Enbridge, frack off” and “Pipelines fail.”

Laurie Hamame | Oberlin News-Tribune

Protesters ended on Rt. 58, where they rallied in front of the pipeline’s construction zone.
https://www.theoberlinnewstribune.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/44/2018/06/web1_IMG_9114.jpgProtesters ended on Rt. 58, where they rallied in front of the pipeline’s construction zone.

Laurie Hamame | Oberlin News-Tribune

Protesters rally against fracked gas line construction

By Laurie Hamame

lhamame@aimmediamidwest.com