Overcoming obstacles, Firelands grad is ‘Tiny Tim’ no more


Once ready to drop out, Yost finds inspiration and a diploma

By Jonathan Delozier - jdelozier@civitasmedia.com



After losing both his father and brother at a young age, Tim Yost used the support of family and the Firelands school district to get his academics and life back on track.

After losing both his father and brother at a young age, Tim Yost used the support of family and the Firelands school district to get his academics and life back on track.


Photos by Jonathan Delozier | Amherst News-Times Jessica Yost, Tim Yost, Mitchell Rivas, and Angelique Yost pose at the Firelands High School commencement ceremony.


For new Firelands and Lorain County JVS graduate Tim Yost, completing high school is just the latest in a long line of victories.

Yost was adopted as an infant by Karl and Angelique Yost. The couple has fostered 75 children since 1987 and has found permanent homes for all of them.

“Timmy is ours and we are blessed to have him. He came to us as a severely premature baby who was born at 28 weeks,” Angelique said. “Our sons named Timmy after Tiny Tim because of how small he was when he came to us. His initial outlook was not very good at all and included the long medical list that goes along with many premature babies like brain and retinal bleeding as well as feeding issues. We took him in and here he is today. We’re very proud of him.”

Karl, before passing away in 2011 following a battle with cancer, served as a deputy for the Lorain County Sheriff’s Office, as a DARE officer, and was the former head of the Lorain County Bomb Squad. He also spent time in the Army and with Homeland Security in Cuyahoga County.

He was perhaps best known for the his work on the case of Steven “Baby Boy Hope” Coleman, an infant found deceased in a duffle bag in 1999 in Columbia Station. Six years later, Yost’s work led to the arrest of the infant’s parents, Jessica Coleman and Thomas Truelson Jr. The mother, a 15-year-old Columbia High student when the baby was born, was sentenced to six years in prison for inflicting lethal injuries on the infant and leaving him in her closet. Truelson, a college student at the time, received a two-year sentence for throwing the body into the Jaquay Quarry in Columbia Township.

After losing his father as well as his brother, 29-year-old Karl Yost II in 2013, Tim said he began to succumb to the anger and sadness that comes with the grieving process.

“I felt like dropping out of school, to be honest,” said Tim. “My grades went from A’s to F’s in a short amount of time. My teachers contacted my mom soon after and she confronted me about it.”

“He was extremely close with his father and his brother,” said Angelique. “We all went through enormous challenges when they passed away. It was very traumatic.”

A special group of men stepped in to provide a helping hand to the family in their time of need, according to Angelique.

“My nephew and former foster son, Mitchell Rivas, stepped in as a father figure for Timmy in the aftermath. Gary Glover, a close friend of my husband’s and pastors from our church also stepped in to help with this process,” said Angelique. “I also have to give the Firelands school district a lot of credit. They’ve surrounded my children with love and care. They have been very instrumental in not only caring for their educations but also their lives.”

“It feels amazing to know that people care this much about me and my future,” said Tim. “These men basically became my new fathers after my dad passed away.”

Within two months, Tim was able to get his grades back on track. He got to walk with his classes at both the Firelands and JVS commencement ceremonies and plans to join the Marines Oct 24 after a few months of classes at Lorain County Community College.

As far as advice for others going through a difficult time, Tim said to think about how loved ones would view your response to a tough situation.

“Push through it,” he said. “If something bad is happening in your life, think about what the person you care about most would think of your reaction to it. What would they say to you? I know my dad wouldn’t have been proud if I dropped out of school.”

Jonathan Delozier can be reached at 440-647-3171 or @DelozierNews on Twitter.

After losing both his father and brother at a young age, Tim Yost used the support of family and the Firelands school district to get his academics and life back on track.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/44/2016/06/web1_IMG_0940.jpgAfter losing both his father and brother at a young age, Tim Yost used the support of family and the Firelands school district to get his academics and life back on track.

Photos by Jonathan Delozier | Amherst News-Times Jessica Yost, Tim Yost, Mitchell Rivas, and Angelique Yost pose at the Firelands High School commencement ceremony.

http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/44/2016/06/web1_IMG_0957.jpg

Photos by Jonathan Delozier | Amherst News-Times Jessica Yost, Tim Yost, Mitchell Rivas, and Angelique Yost pose at the Firelands High School commencement ceremony.

Once ready to drop out, Yost finds inspiration and a diploma

By Jonathan Delozier

jdelozier@civitasmedia.com