A Christian conservative who loves gays and lesbians


To the editor:

Jesus befriended and respected a woman from a despised race of people. He was a Jew; she was a Samaritan. The mere fact that she was a woman was “bad enough” but she was also of the “wrong race.” Jesus also protected another woman from being stoned to death. She had been caught in adultery. He befriended and dined with embezzlers, two named Matthew and Zacchias. He also did not hesitate to reach out and touch people in an effort to cure them, nor did he stop them from touching his garment in a desperate effort to be cured.

In every instance where he disobeyed the teaching of the pharasaical laws, he never supported immoral, illegal, or unhealthy behaviors. He supported and loved the person but lovingly and directly told the individuals to “go and sin no more” or “your faith has made you whole.”

What he truly hated was hypocrisy, which is why he told the men accusing the adulterous woman to start throwing stones at her if they themselves were perfect, but none could do so. No one could keep up the hypocritical charade of perfection. I am not without sin, thus I throw no stones (I John 1:8-10). Jesus got along better with “publicans and sinners” than the “religious” people.

Any sexual behavior outside of marriage, whether heterosexual or homosexual, is considered an abomination (Leviticus 18:26-29). So anyone who performs any of various kinds of sexual behaviors in Leviticus 18:1-23, Romans 1:18-32, I Corinthians 6:9, and portions of II Timothy 3:1-5 also are committing abominations. Why are any of these premarital or extramarital acts considered despicable to God? Because the acts defile the place in which his Holy Spirit dwells or desires to dwell, which is the human mind and body. So when a man and woman marry, the intercourse they enjoy is a picture of Christ the groom and the true church the bride joining together in eternal union. Read the Song of Solomon for a fairly erotic depiction of this courtship and union.

The Rev. Sammie Davis-Dyson

Oberlin